In The News

Safety Matters on Microtrenching Jobsites

The stakes are high for crews that work beneath the earth’s surface. When working on underground construction jobs, there is always a risk of striking a utility unless proper safety procedures are followed. And, with an ever-increasing demand for high-speed internet, fiber lines continue to build on the already overwhelming amount of underground utilities spanning beneath cities around the globe.

Deadly and Avoidable Danger

It can happen in an instant: A metal drill bit taps an electric utility line and deadly current arcs through the equipment, spelling catastrophe for the unlucky operator.

Electrical strikes are not the most common of excavation dangers, but are one of few that can produce immediate fatalities. Fortunately, there are steps operators can take — some basic, some more advanced — to protect against electrical strikes.

More Than a Mow-and-Go Crew

Jacob Godar, owner and CEO of Scooter’s Lawn Care Inc., was destined for entrepreneurship. He just didn’t know it yet. Right out of high school, he began working as a landscaping foreman, but within a few years, he found himself in the auto body industry. After a little self-reflection, however, he realized that automotive wasn’t what he wanted to ultimately do.

Training a New Generation of Workers

Contractors like Jay Flositz, owner of directional drilling company Coastal Cable in Florida, say it’s easier to find someone who can run equipment, but has never operated a drill. That allows the workers to be trained the way the company wants them trained.

Microtrenching Lets Utilities Keep Pace with Internet Demand
Microtrenching Lets Utilities Keep Pace with Internet Demand

It’s not exactly news that the demand for instantaneous, high-speed internet connections is growing by leaps and bounds with no sign of easing up anytime soon. As a result, the number of fiber-optic installations is rapidly increasing as carriers scramble to bring fiber cable directly to homes, businesses, schools, and government facilities.

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